Black News, Entertainment, Style and Culture - HuffPost Black Voices
iOS app Android app More
July 28, 2014

About a "Girl" Who Refused to Just Shut up and Take Orders

Donald Sterling ASSOCIATED PRESS

You could argue that the woman on the recording didn't really set up the man on the recording; instead, she let events play out in a way that seemed quite characteristic for the Clippers owner.

George Zimmerman Wants To Keep Fighting With NBC

George Zimmerman
ASSOCIATED PRESS

ESPN Host Defends Comments About Women Provoking Domestic Violence

First Take
ESPN

Chicago Gun Violence May City's Mayor His Job

Rahm Emanuel
Scott Olson via Getty Images

Vet Services Oakland Youth In Incredible Way

Kelly Carlisle
ABC News

7 Ways That You (Yes, You) Could End Up On A Terrorist Watch List

Checking Box Form
Getty Images

Renisha McBride, Trayvon Martin And How Race & Gender Have Affected Coverage

Biden Slams Voter ID Laws As 'An Attempt To Repress Minority Voting'

Joe Biden
ASSOCIATED PRESS

My Son Has Been Suspended Five Times. He's 3

African American Getting On School Bus
Blend Images - KidStock via Getty Images

NFL Suspended Ravens Star Two Games Over Domestic Violence Arrest

Ray Rice
Andy Lyons via Getty Images

Newark Schools Under Investigation For Racism

Cami Anderson
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Eric Garner's Funeral Fuels Pain, Anger And Calls For Justice

Eric Garner
Pool via Getty Images

Porch Shooter First Told Cops It Was An Accident

Theodore Wafer
ASSOCIATED PRESS

New Videos Show Another Alleged NYPD Chokehold

Choke
Kelmy Rodriquez via Facebook

Twitter Admits It Hires Too Many White And Asian Men

Twitter Founder
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Arrest Made In Stray Bullet Killing Of 11-Year-Old Girl

Shamiya Adams
Scott Olson via Getty Images

Meet The Lawyer Who Decided To Battle Racism Outside Of The Courtroom

Anurag Gupta
Patricia Schneidewind

Opening Statements Reveal Shooter's State Of Mind In Renisha McBride Case

Renisha Mcbride
Now This News

These Examples Of Blackface Around The World Prove We Have A Long Way To Go

Blackface
ASSOCIATED PRESS

11 Parents Of Kidnapped Nigerian Girls Have Died

Nigeria
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Man Accused Of Threatening To Kill Obama

Obama
MANDEL NGAN via Getty Images

Follow HuffPost

    1. HuffPost
    2. Black Voices
    1. HuffPost
    2. Black Voices
    1. Most Popular on HuffPost
    2. Latest News
    3. Black Voices
    4. View all RSS feeds

Aaron McGruder's Latest Show Has Sparked Serious Outrage

Black Jesus
Cartoon Network

WATCH
How This Former Runaway-Turned-Cellist Discovered Her Inner Beauty

Kelsey Lu Mcjunkins
YouTube

'Halo' Subway Singer Gives Beyonce A Run For Her Money

Halo
YouTube

The Real Reason Why Tupac-Inspired Broadway Musical Closed

Saul Williams
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jada Pinkett Smith: There's An 'Epidemic In Regards To The Treatment Of Women'

Jada Pinkett Smith
Getty

Nicki Minaj's 'Anaconda' Cover Art Is Just As NSFW As You'd Imagine

Nicki Minaj
Instagram

Nas Makes History Again!

Nas
Donald Traill/Invision/AP

2016 Date Set For 'The Best Man' Threequel

The Best Man Wedding
Universal

Questlove: Iggy Azalea's 'Fancy' Is A Game-Changer

Questlove
ASSOCIATED PRESS

WATCH
This Is What Happens When You 'Disrespect' Lauryn Hill!

Lauryn Hill
RTNKabik/MediaPunch/IPx

Sherri Shepherd's Huge Custody Victory

Sherri Shepherd
JPI

Pregnant!

Zoe Saldana Marco
Pascal Le Segretain via Getty Images

Whitney Houston's Family Slams Lifetime Biopic

Whitney Houston 2009
ASSOCIATED PRESS

The King Of Pop Just Got A Huge Honor From His Hometown

Michael Jackson
AFP via Getty Images

Marvel Won't Make A Black Captain America Movie 'Any Time Soon'

Female Thor
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Then and Now: Former Child Star Kim Fields Stays Working ... Behind the Scenes

Comments (20)


While many child stars experienced ups and downs during their careers, particularly as they got older, some were able to escape scrutiny and flourish into successful adult actors.

Known to many as Tootie from the 1980s NBC sitcom 'The Facts of Life' or Regine Hunter from Fox's 1990s sitcom 'Living Single,' Kim Fields has transitioned from beloved actress to working director. Her directorial projects include multiple episodes on 'Tyler Perry's Meet the Browns' and 'Tyler Perry's House of Payne.'

As the daughter of actress and director Chip Fields ('Good Times') and the older sister of actress Alexis Fields ('Moesha'), the New York native used her degree from Pepperdine University to place herself in a position behind the camera and learn the craft that many women aren't recognized for.

Blackvoices.com caught up with the former-child-star-turned-renaissance-woman. Excerpts of the conversation are below.


Black Voices: You've been around a number of years and have done a number of projects. What's going on with you now?

Kim Fields: A couple of different things. I'm currently the host for 'Lens on Talent,' which is BET and Johnson & Johnson's filmmaker show. I'm really so excited about the show and the guests we had on, from Lisa Cortez, the Oscar-nominated producer for 'Precious,' to Roger Bobb, who is the executive president of Tyler Perry Studios to Tamir Mohammad from Tribeca Film Institute. There's a really well-rounded group of people this year lending their wisdom and experiences and expertise to the show. Just because this is a specific industry, there are certain things that are universal. If you're a new mom and you work in corporate America or retail or the filmmaking world, you're still a new mom at the end of the day. There are certain things people can relate to even if they're not sharing the same industry experiences. In tandem with that, I also direct here in Atlanta on Tyler Perry's 'Meet the Browns.'

BV: Did you ever think you would do this sort of work when you first started out in this business?

KF: Maybe not when I first started because I was 7 or 8 years old. I thought I was going to be a marine biologist. I think as I got a little bit older, being around crews and sets... I always said I was a crew baby, so I always liked sitting by the cameras and learning from the camera people about shots, framing and things of that nature. Talking to the lighting director about different looks with the lighting. I got my start professionally back in '94 after being really dissatisfied as an actor and an audience member, and seeing if I could contribute in another way.

BV: What's it like working with Tyler Perry and doing more than 100 shows?

KF: Well, it's really a blessing I don't take it for granted. Everything that Tyler does, these are his babies, and to be entrusted with that, I don't take that lightly at all. Because he's got a very specific eye, specific tastes, he's got a formula and he knows what works and is in a number of ways a genius. At the same time, he lets me know unequivocally that he respects my eye and my tastes and wants to marry the two. It's certainly a blessing to go to a studio where the person built it from the ground up. It's a different feeling from going to Warner Bros. or Sony. To be able to contribute in this way and have that one-on-one exposure. I guess it would be like the old days of the studio system, where the stars could talk to Louis B. Mayor and Jack Warner. It's fun and fascinating.

BV: You signed a first-look deal with the Gospel Music Channel. What are they looking for you to contribute?

KF: The thing that excited me about the GMC is dealing with a faith-based audience, something you do get to explore with Tyler. Right now the opening stages at Tyler's studios are driven by Tyler's vision. This outlet gives me the opportunity to create from scratch. I'm so in love with doing projects for a faith-based community, not solely. I don't want to give my career to that audience. I think it's still important in the story you tell to uplift as you entertain, especially for women. I'm so over reality and housewives and bad women and bad girls.

BV: As part of two successful series, when people see you these days what do they associate you with, Tootie or Regine?

KF: Really just Kim Fields, the brand, and that's a blessing I don't take for granted. The first reaction seems to be, "Oh my gosh, you're Kim Fields." Sometimes it's 'Meet the Browns.' People really know I do that show. Sometimes it's people saying, "I grew up with you. We still watch 'Living Single.'" Sometimes it's from the poetry standpoint, what I've done as a spoken word artist. It really varies. It's a constant reminder to me of the gifts and talents I've been blessed with.

BV: Any thoughts about coming back on the screen as an actress, even if it's in a comedy or a drama?

KF: Very much so. Me and Tyler have talked about it, the president of the studio, GMC, and I have talked about it. At this point, I'm looking for projects that challenge me as an actor. I've been blessed to be in the industry for so long and yet there's so much that I haven't done, different characters to portray and genres I've barely scratched the surface on. I'm certainly in love with content that's on the Web. It may be a matter of something online first. I recognize that I'm certainly not in the driver's seat. A friend of mine told me that several years ago. "You just sit in the passenger seat," she said. "And keep your seat belt on and let God drive you where he's driving you on the road he mapped out. Keep quiet; he doesn't need direction from you."

BV: What keeps you passionate about doing this?

KF: God has kept that alive in me -- as an actor and a director and as a member of the entertainment community. Aside from that, mortgage bills will certainly motivate you to get up in the morning and then my family. I have the most amazing family in the world with my husband, Christopher, and my son, Sebastian. They're so extraordinarily supportive of what I do. My mother, of course, my sister... everyone. Everyone that has been part of the village it takes to raise this child and turn her into a woman. I couldn't fathom my life without them.

BV: Everyone in your family is in the business. Have you ever thought about putting a project together that they can all be a part of?

KF: We want to stay in love with each other as family members, so probably not, no. Every time we talk about it, we're like "no."

BV: 'Living Single' had a good long run on a major network. Why aren't we getting that winning formula on today's television?

KF: I don't know. I think you have people very much living in fear of losing their jobs. They want to go with what's safe. They want to go with what they know, so you get a lot of regurgitation and then that sense of, "We don't know an audience that wants to see it." It's total crap at the end of the day. Pardon me for being so crass, but it's total crap. Why would the show be so popular in syndication long after the show was shot? It's all right. It's making it easier for me to establish that work.

Comments: (20)

Add a comment

Page 1 of 2

Add a Comment

Please keep your comments relevant to this blog entry. Email addresses are never displayed but they are required to confirm your comments. When you enter your name and email address, you'll be sent a link to confirm your comment, and a password. To leave another comment, just use that password."